Speech and language therapist

Speech and language therapist

“A speech and language therapist provides speech, language, communication and eating, drinking and swallowing therapies”

A speech and language therapist provides speech, language, communication and eating, drinking and swallowing therapies. They work in many settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, in the community, within charities, schools, and peoples’ homes. There are opportunities throughout your career to specialise and move into leadership, training and research roles. The broad purpose of the role is to improve quality of life, health and wellbeing for people with communication difficulties and dysphagia (eating, drinking and swallowing difficulties). Applying evidence-based science to clinical practice, you’ll be the lead professional who assesses and improves outcomes for people with these difficulties. You may work with children to identify and develop their communication difficulties so they can reach their full potential, or work with adults with conditions that affect their communication and swallowing such as stroke, dementia or Parkinson’s, or support those with learning disabilities to communicate. You may also might carry out research, work in specialist medical units, or provide advice on communication aids, for example, to children with cerebral palsy. On completion, you’ll achieve a bachelor’s degree in speech and language therapy.

Duration: 48 months

Relevant school subjects: Science

Entry requirements: Three A-levels or an equivalent Access qualification

Achievement upon completion: Level 6 (Degree)—equivalent to a bachelor’s degree

Potential salary upon completion: £28,000 per annum

Find out more: www.apprenticeshipguide.co.uk